Please alert us to any other recent or forthcoming books by Rhodes Scholars by emailing development@rhodeshouse.ox.ac.uk or use the Rhodes Scholar Information Update form here.

2017

Quintember, Attu, begat

Richard Major (New Zealand and Magdalen 1985)

Three books will be released in June 2017.

Quintember - When there are high crimes to be covered up, mysteries to be wrapped in enigmas, or a murderer to be liquidated - literally - there is only one man in England who can be trusted with the task: Felix Culpepper, tutor in Classics at St Wygefortis' College, Cambridge, and assassin-at-large for the British Establishment. From the eerie deserts of New Mexico to the high-rolling hotels of the Adriatic, Culpepper moves with consummate ease and an unexpected penchant for guns, drugs and esoteric methods of murder - all to save himself from the drudgery of cramming Latin into the privileged yet empty skulls of the dregs of Britain's aristocracy. With an intellectual vanity that rivals Holmes, more self-esteem than Bond and a blood-steeped amorality that out-Ripleys Hannibal Lecter, Culpepper is the ideal hero for our debased days. And only in his student, sidekick (and pending Nemesis) Margot ffontaines-Laigh, does he meet his match. 

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2017

The New Zealand Project

Max Harris (New Zealand & Balliol 2012)

By any measure, New Zealand must confront monumental issues in the years ahead. From the future of work to climate change, wealth inequality to new populism – these challenges are complex and even unprecedented. Yet why does New Zealand’s political discussion seem so diminished, and our political imagination unequal to the enormity of these issues? And why is this gulf particularly apparent to young New Zealanders? These questions sit at the centre of Max Harris’s ‘New Zealand project’.

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2017

A World in Disarray: American Foreign Policy and the Crisis of the Old Order

Dr Richard Haass (Florida & Wadham 1973)

In A World in Disarray, Haass argues for an updated global operating system—call it world order 2.0—that reflects the reality that power is widely distributed and that borders count for less.  One critical element of this adjustment will be adopting a new approach to sovereignty, one that embraces its obligations and responsibilities as well as its rights and protections. 

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2016

Forests Are Gold: Trees, People, and Environmental Rule in Vietnam

Pam McElwee (Kansas & Wadham 1993)

Forests Are Gold examines the management of Vietnam's forests in the tumultuous twentieth century--from French colonialism to the recent transition to market-oriented economics - as the country united, prospered, and transformed people and landscapes. Forest policy has rarely been about ecology or conservation for nature's sake, but about managing citizens and society, a process Pamela McElwee terms "environmental rule." Untangling and understanding these practices and networks of rule illuminates not just thorny issues of environmental change, but also the birth of Vietnam itself.

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2017

Unlikely Partners

Julian Gewirtz (Connecticut & St Edmund Hall 2013)

Unlikely Partners recounts the story of how Chinese politicians and intellectuals looked beyond their country’s borders for economic guidance at a key crossroads in the nation’s tumultuous twentieth century. Julian Gewirtz offers a dramatic tale of competition for influence between reformers and hardline conservatives during the Deng Xiaoping era, bringing to light China’s productive exchanges with the West. Read reviews in the The Economist and Financial Times.

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2016

Democracy Against Domination

K. Sabeel Rahman (New York & Pembroke 2005)

This book is a new response to economic and social inequality as well as democratic theory and democratic institutional design.

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2016

Fighting Hurt: Rule and Exception in Torture and War

Henry Shue (North Carolina & Merton 1961)

Fighting Hurt brings together key essays by Henry Shue on the issue of torture, and relatedly, the moral challenges surrounding the initiation and conduct of war, and features a new introduction outlining the argument of the essays, putting them into context, and describing how and in what ways his position has modified over time.

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2016

A Boy on the Last Boat: A Journey Around the World

Dr Ben Lochtenberg (Western Australia & Brasenose 1954)

Lochtenberg's memoir: A Singapore-born young colonial Dutch boy, whose father suffered and died as a Japanese prisoner of war building a railway in Sumatra, escaped from Java with his mother and arrived as a refugee in Australia in 1942. Educated by Jesuits and then at the University of Western Australia and at Oxford, he had a career with ICI initially as an engineer, ending in 1993 following senior executive and Board roles in Australia, England, Canada and finally in the United States. His life from childhood in European colonies in Asia, spanned major changes in technology and the chemical industry. With his wife and seven children, he experienced and adjusted to a wide range of cultures and societies. During the twenty years of retirement in Melbourne, he has been active in mental health research at the University of Melbourne, Newman College, in support of palliative care, homelessness and refugees - the latter being where his story began

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